27 Apr

Cloudflare hosting F root server

A few days some folks in internet community noticed Cloudflare AS13335 announcing F root server’s routes covering prefix 192.5.5.0/24.

 

 

Above tweet shows that case is clearly not a mistake but rather some sort of arrangement between Cloudflare and ISC (which is responsible for F-root). There was another discussion on DNS-OARC mailing list here.

From our bgp.he.net tool, one can analyse route propagation for F root’s AS3557.

 

Here we can see that routes are visible from AS13335 to Telefonica AS13335. One can safely assume that AS12956 (considered to be a Tier1 / transit free network as per list here) is not a customer of Cloudflare. So the fact that still route is being announced to Telefonica gives an impression that AS3557 is downstream of Cloudflare.

It’s hard to say on the kind of arrangement as I still see many of instances of F-root are being hosted directly by ISC from hostname.bind query triggered via local RIPE Atlas probes in those regions. It could be that Cloudflare is hosting a part of this setup say in developing region where they have their caching PoPs. Yet to see a detailed blog post from Cloudflare about it. (I like their detailed blog!)

27 Oct

Being Open How Facebook Got Its Edge

An excellent presentation by James Quinn from Facebook on “Being Open How Facebook Got Its Edge” at NANOG68. YouTube link here and video is embedded in the post below.

 

 

Some key points mentioned by James:

  1. BGP routing is inefficient as scale grows especially around distributing traffic. They can get a lot of traffic concentrated to a specific PoP apart from the fact that BGP best AS_PATH can simply be an inefficient low AS_PATH based path.
  2. Facebook comes with a cool idea of “evolving beyond BGP with BGP” where they use BGP concepts to beat some of the BGP-related problems.
  3. He also points to fact that IPv6 has much larger address space and huge summarization can result in egress problems for them. A single route announcement can just have almost entire network behind it!
  4. Traffic management is based on local and a global controller. Local controller picks efficient routes, injects them via BGP and takes care of traffic balancing within a given PoP/city, balancing traffic across local circuits. On the other hand, Global PoP is based on DNS logic and helps in moving traffic across cities.

 

It’s wonderful to see that Facebook is solving the performance and load related challenges using fundamental blocks like BGP (local controller) and DNS (global controller). 🙂